Wed, Mar 31 | Online Event

I'm a Good Person! Isn't That Enough?

This program is designed to support white people in making the paradigm shift from ‘fixing’ and ‘helping’ those believed to be inferior, to focusing on internalized white superiority and its role in perpetuating racism at the individual, interpersonal, institutional, and cultural levels.
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I'm a Good Person! Isn't That Enough?

Time & Location

Mar 31, 7:00 PM
Online Event

About the Event

Using  historical and media images, racial justice educator and writer, Debby  Irving, examines how she used her white-skewed belief system to  interpret the world around her. Socialized on a narrow worldview, Debby  explores how she spent decades silently reaffirming harmful, archaic  racial patterns instead of questioning the racial disparities and  tensions she could see and feel. This program is designed to support  white people in making the paradigm shift from ‘fixing’ and ‘helping’  those believed to be inferior, to focusing on internalized white  superiority and its role in perpetuating racism at the individual,  interpersonal, institutional, and cultural levels.

Registration Required

About Debby Irving Debby, a white woman, was raised in Winchester, Massachusetts during the  socially turbulent 1960s and ‘70s. After a blissfully sheltered,  upper-middle-class suburban childhood, she found herself simultaneously  intrigued and horrified by the racial divide she observed in Boston.  From 1984 to 2009, her work in urban neighborhoods and schools left her  feeling helpless. Why did people live so differently along racial lines?  Why were student outcomes so divergent? Why did she get so jumpy when  talking to a person of color? Where did the fear of saying something  stupid or offensive come from, and why couldn’t she make it go away? The  more she tried to understand racial dynamics, the more confused she  became.

In 2009, a course at Wheelock College, Racial and Cultural Identity,  shook Debby awake with the realization that she’d missed step #1:  examining the way being a member of the 'normal' race had interfered  with her attempts to understand racism. What began as a professional  endeavor became a personal journey, as she shifted from trying to figure  out people whom she’d been taught to see as 'other' to making sense of  her own socialization. Her book Waking Up White is the story of  her two-step-forward-one-step back journey away from racial ignorance.  She continues to study racism and strategies for its undoing while  working to educate other white people confused and frustrated by racism.  She remembers these feelings all too well and is passionate about  transforming anxiety and inaction into empowerment and action, be it for  an individual or an organization.

Registration is Closed

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